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Archived News: Metal detecting, gold prospecting,treasure hunting news and stories. 1000 Silver coins buried during the English Civil war found by metal detectorist. A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a ploughed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace. The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the Parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell. This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war. A few smaller scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington. Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as monumental and says that it was buried early 1643, just months after the war broke out, which is identified by the date of the latest coin. It contains coins from the reigns of Edward VI, Elizabeth, Mary, James I, and Charles I and the largest hoard from that time in Lincolnshire county. It acquaints us with the fear and uncertainty during that period. The exact reason why it was buried or by whom may never be revealed. A possible explanation could be that it was left by a soldier prior to fighting in the war, but never returned. During the Civil War someone could easily support a living with only £20 a year. The total value of the hoard, at the time it was buried would have been £34, which would make it quite a significant sum. The current value will be determined once a decision has been made whether it will be declared a treasure. In 2008 a collection of 15 Silver and Gold coins, dating from the same time period, sold at auction for £35,933. Gold prospector enhances wealth through gold finds once again. A gold prospector from Australia who is a regular treasure hunter and at Surfer's Paradise beach. His efforts have been rewarded multiple times with various finds. He found 3 gold nuggets initially and struck even more luck with a follow up find of 4 more nuggets. He said he and his mate reckon the nuggets are most likely scattered broken fragments from the same rock. The spot where his finds originate from is a closely guarded secret. He says there are many people on the beach searching for the same treasures. Gold is a well known occurance around the area, not only around reefs and on the beach, but also in streams. When erosion breaks down rocks, the metal is often revealed. Mines operated in Ormeau and Kingston in the 1960s and a significant amount of precious metal was extracted. Mr.Gregg's nugget finds weigh between 20g and 70g each and the gold is embedded in quartz rock which indicates it is naturally occurring native mineral. What is next for this lucky gold prospector? We could very well be reporting more finds in the near future. Britain’s largest gold nugget Vincent Thurkettle from Somerset, South West England is a dedicated treasure hunter and gold prospector who now holds the record of finding the largest gold nugget in the U.K, weighing 97.12 grams (3 oz). The find was made in 2012 near the shipwreck of the Royal Charter, off the coast of Anglesey, Northwest Wales, but kept a secret until recently to allow him to search the area thoroughly, undisturbed. At age 16 Vincent left school and trained as a Chartered Forester, following his studies worked for the Forestry Commission.He had a keen interest in treasurehunting, also wanted to write a book and in 2005, after filling the position of Deputy Director,decided to retire from his job to pursue his dreams, which he both fullfilled by making several very valuable finds and writing a book named The Wood Fire Handbook.He describes his passion for treasurehunting: “Every little speck of gold I’ve found around the world has been a thrill – the campfires I’ve sat around, the people I’ve met, the places. For me it is genuinely the adventure and lifestyle rather than the desire." The Royal Charter was a robust, speedy iron-hulled steam clipper built in 1855. Ideal for the challenging Liverpool-Australia route, often plagued by devastating storms. In 1851 a discovery of gold in Victoria resulted in a gold rush and many people were travelling to and from Britain to Australia and often passangers returned with their finds.During a return trip to Liverpool in 1959 there was a cargo of 79 000 ounces of gold, which was insured for an estimated £120 million according to today's value, plus more by miner passengers. The ship encountered a violent storm off the coast of Anglesey near the village of Moelfre. The captain thought it feasible to drop anchor in Moelfre Bay, lowered the sails and shut down the engines with hope that northerly winds would drive the ship towards North Wales. This decision proved to be fateful as the ship ended up assaulted by the roughest part of the storm, the ancor chain broke and finally the ship crashed onto rocks, broke apart and sank. Only 39 people from the 450 passanger made it ashore.The owners of the ship and insurance underwriters embarked on a salvage operation to try to recover as much as they could of the valuable cargo, this continued for years and after 80% was recovered, it was officially declared concluded. Following this treasure hunters started searching the area and throughout the years discovered more of the lost gold.Anything found close to a shipwreck are reported to the Receiver of Wreck. They do research to establish who the owner may be and then determine where it should go. If a year goes by with no avail to determine ownership, any such finds are claimed by the crown, but by law the finder is entitled to a finder's fee. Vincent’s find is valued at £50 000. The value is determined not only by the gold material, but also the original shape and history. It is expected to be put on display in a museum. The second largest gold nuggest found in Britain is the Carnon Nugget, which weighs 59g and was found in Cornwall in 1808 and the Rutherford Nugget, found in Scotland in 1869, 57.9g holds the 3rd place. Gold and silver coins hoard and medieval ring. Mr.Massey from Wrexham discovered a hoard of three 23 carat gold and twenty five silver coins in a field in Bronington. They were buried or lost together after 1465 and are from the reign of Edward III, Richard II, Henry VI. On the same field in 2014, Mr.Massey found a gold ring with cabochon blue sapphire, dating from the 15th century. These items are estimated to be worth thousands and have been declared a treasure. The coins and medieval ring are currently at the National Museum of Wales but Wrexham County Borough Museum hopes to acquire them. Metal detecting finds - Gold Pendant Mr. Pratt from Norfolk made a rare and valuable discovery on a field near Attleborough,with his metal detector. At first he thought it may be just a golden bottle cap, but upon uncovering it more, discovered a pendant made of high quality gold in a good condidition, dating back to the 6th Century. Made more than 1,500 years ago, this early Anglo-Saxon pendant features the image of Emperor Justinian as it appeared on Byzantine coin. Finds officer Dr. Adrian Marsden from Norwich Castle Museum said it was originally made in France, may have come to England as result of an export trade at the time and that the jewellery likely had a special significance to the owner and was buried with them. It could possibly indicate a cemetery on the field where it was found and Mr. Pratt joined a search project lead by a team from the Norfolk Heritage Recovery Group. The pendant is due for valuation by the British museum, following evaluation by the coroner, after which Mr. Pratt will be rewarded for the find. Mr Pratt is an experienced metal detectorist and has made other finds of archaeological interest. A similar pendant, which was declared a treasure in 2013, was discovered by another metal detectorist on land at North Elmham. It is aproximately the size of a modern penny and an imitation of a gold solidus coin featuring emperor Maurice Tiberius (582-602 AD). This pendant is also believed to have entered England from it's origin in France and buried with it's owner. Both pendants were made into jewellery following their arrival in England and belonged to wealthy people. Hammered Silver coin hoard in pristine condition, dating back to 13th century found A hoard of 38 hammered silver coins was discovered in in Coventry. This hoard was buried under the floor of a 13th century house. Inside a wooden container was found hammered silver pennies dating back to the reign of EdwardI (1272-1307) as well as EdwardIII (1327-77). Rare coins were discovered among them. Depositing coins in a hoard, which are then buried under a house or at a specific location, for the purpose of recovering later, was a regular practise during that era and several such discoveries have been made trough treasure hunting and metal detectors are often able to reach deep enough to locate such metal targets. Hammered silver coins of all types are a favorite find, rare and highly valuable types can be detected. Each find tells us something about history and often museums are interested in purchasing such finds to display.
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Archived News: Metal detecting, gold prospecting, treasure hunting news and stories. 1000 Silver coins buried during the English Civil war found by metal detectorist. A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a ploughed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace. The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the Parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell. This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war. A few smaller scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington. Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as monumental and says that it was buried early 1643, just months after the war broke out, which is identified by the date of the latest coin. It contains coins from the reigns of Edward VI, Elizabeth, Mary, James I, and Charles I and the largest hoard from that time in Lincolnshire county. It acquaints us with the fear and uncertainty during that period. The exact reason why it was buried or by whom may never be revealed. A possible explanation could be that it was left by a soldier prior to fighting in the war, but never returned. During the Civil War someone could easily support a living with only £20 a year. The total value of the hoard, at the time it was buried would have been £34, which would make it quite a significant sum. The current value will be determined once a decision has been made whether it will be declared a treasure. In 2008 a collection of 15 Silver and Gold coins, dating from the same time period, sold at auction for £35,933. Gold prospector enhances wealth through gold finds once again. A gold prospector from Australia who is a regular treasure hunter and at Surfer's Paradise beach. His efforts have been rewarded multiple times with various finds. He found 3 gold nuggets initially and struck even more luck with a follow up find of 4 more nuggets. He said he and his mate reckon the nuggets are most likely scattered broken fragments from the same rock. The spot where his finds originate from is a closely guarded secret. He says there are many people on the beach searching for the same treasures. Gold is a well known occurance around the area, not only around reefs and on the beach, but also in streams. When erosion breaks down rocks, the metal is often revealed. Mines operated in Ormeau and Kingston in the 1960s and a significant amount of precious metal was extracted. Mr.Gregg's nugget finds weigh between 20g and 70g each and the gold is embedded in quartz rock which indicates it is naturally occurring native mineral. What is next for this lucky gold prospector? We could very well be reporting more finds in the near future. Britain’s largest gold nugget Vincent Thurkettle from Somerset, South West England is a dedicated treasure hunter and gold prospector who now holds the record of finding the largest gold nugget in the U.K, weighing 97.12 grams (3 oz). The find was made in 2012 near the shipwreck of the Royal Charter, off the coast of Anglesey, Northwest Wales, but kept a secret until recently to allow him to search the area thoroughly, undisturbed. At age 16 Vincent left school and trained as a Chartered Forester, following his studies worked for the Forestry Commission.He had a keen interest in treasure hunting, also wanted to write a book and in 2005, after filling the position of Deputy Director,decided to retire from his job to pursue his d reams, which he both fullfilled by making several very v aluable finds and writing a book named The Wood Fire Handbook.He describes his passion for treasure hunting: “Every little speck of gold I’ve found around the world has been a thrill – the campfires I’ve sat around, the people I’ve met, the places. For me it is genuinely the adventure and lifestyle rather than the desire." The Royal Charter was a robust, speedy iron-hulled steam clipper built in 1855. Ideal for the challenging Liverpool- Australia route, often plagued by devastating storms. In 1851 a discovery of gold in Victoria resulted in a gold rush and many people were travelling to and from Britain to Australia and often passangers returned with their finds. During a return trip to Liverpool in 1959 there was a cargo of 79 000 ounces of gold, which was insured for an estimated £120 million according to today's value, plus more by miner passengers. The ship encountered a violent storm off the coast of Anglesey near the village of Moelfre. The captain thought it feasible to drop anchor in Moelfre Bay, lowered the sails and shut down the engines with hope that northerly winds would drive the ship towards North Wales. This decision proved to be fateful as the ship ended up assaulted by the roughest part of the storm, the ancor chain broke and finally the ship crashed onto rocks, broke apart and sank. Only 39 people from the 450 passanger made it ashore.The owners of the ship and insurance underwriters embarked on a salvage operation to try to recover as much as they could of the valuable cargo, this continued for years and after 80% was recovered, it was officially declared concluded. Following this treasure hunters started searching the area and throughout the years discovered more of the lost gold. Anything found close to a shipwreck are reported to the Receiver of Wreck. They do research to establish who the owner may be and then determine where it should go. If a year goes by with no avail to determine ownership, any such finds are claimed by the crown, but by law the finder is entitled to a finder's fee. Vincent’s find is valued at £50 000. The value is determined not only by the gold material, but also the original shape and history. It is expected to be put on display in a museum. The second largest gold nuggest found in Britain is the Carnon Nugget, which weighs 59g and was found in Cornwall in 1808 and the Rutherford Nugget, found in Scotland in 1869, 57.9g holds the 3rd place. Gold and silver coins hoard and medieval ring. Mr.Massey from Wrexham discovered a hoard of three 23 carat gold and twenty five silver coins in a field in Bronington. They were buried or lost together after 1465 and are from the reign of Edward III, Richard II, Henry VI. On the same field in 2014, Mr.Massey found a gold ring with cabochon blue sapphire, dating from the 15th century. These items are estimated to be worth thousands and have been declared a treasure. The coins and medieval ring are currently at the National Museum of Wales but Wrexham County Borough Museum hopes to acquire them. Metal detecting finds - Gold Pendant Mr. Pratt from Norfolk made a rare and valuable discovery on a field near Attleborough,with his metal detector. At first he thought it may be just a golden bottle cap, but upon uncovering it more, discovered a pendant made of high quality gold in a good condidition, dating to the 6th Century. Made more than 1,500 years ago, this early Anglo-Saxon pendant features the image of Emperor Justinian as it appeared on Byzantine coin. Finds officer Dr. Adrian Marsden from Norwich Castle Museum said it was originally made in France, may have come to England as result of an export trade at the time and that the jewellery likely had a special significance to the owner and was buried with them. It could possibly indicate a cemetery on the field where it was found and Mr. Pratt joined a search project lead by a team from the Norfolk Heritage Recovery Group. The pendant is due for valuation by the British museum, following evaluation by the coroner, after which Mr. Pratt will be rewarded for the find. Mr Pratt is an experienced metal detectorist and has made other finds of archaeological interest. A similar pendant, which was declared a treasure in 2013, was discovered by another metal detectorist on land at North Elmham. It is aproximately the size of a modern penny and an imitation of a gold solidus coin featuring emperor Maurice Tiberius (582-602 AD). This pendant is also believed to have entered England from it's origin in France and buried with it's owner. Both pendants were made into jewellery following their arrival in England and belonged to wealthy people. Hammered Silver coin hoard in pristine condition, dating back to 13th century found A hoard of 38 hammered silver coins was discovered in Coventry. This hoard was buried under the floor of a 13th century house. Inside a wooden container was found hammered silver pennies dating back to the reign of EdwardI (1272-1307) as well as EdwardIII (1327-77). Rare coins were discovered among them. Depositing coins in a hoard, which are then buried under a house or at a specific location, for the purpose of recovering later, was a regular practise during that era and several such discoveries have been made trough treasure hunting and metal detectors are often able to reach deep enough to locate such metal targets. Hammered silver coins of all types are a favorite find, rare and highly valuable types can be detected. Each find tells us something about history and often museums are interested in purchasing such finds to display.
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